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Two Olde Dawgs: Planting the Vegepod

By Ian Leatt

It’s the beginning of May and I hear a little knocking at the door. Rising and opening the door, I am greeted by a smiling face. “Morning,” says Gord. “Nice day to plant the Vegepod.” He’s referring to the raised container we built in the fall for growing vegetables in. You can see the video of us building it by following the QR code.

“Sure is,” I reply, “I have everything we need to make it nice and easy. Do you want a fresh cup of coffee before we go outside?” I ask Gord, seems rude not to.

We venture outside after a little chat and set about the task at hand. First off, the soil that had been placed in the Vegepod. It was extremely dry. Using a regular garden hose, we water the soil. Having watered for a little while, we turn the soil using a small-handled rake, bringing dry soil back up from the bottom. Once again, we water the soil for a time, then turn through, leaving a damp soil ready for planting.

Let the fun begin.

A large piece of wooden dowel is used to make the holes large enough to plant the celery plugs to a depth of 3 inches. We place the plug in and pack the soil firmly around the base. Two rows of celery should do it. Celery needs good clean rich soil. It is a heavy drinker so always ensure it is kept well-watered.

Next up, spring onions. Using a piece of 2-by-1 some 36 inches in length, pressing down on the soft soil we trace a row parallel to the celery, ensuring enough space between rows. At a depth of 2 inches, gently drop the seeds in the open row. Then gently collapse the soil back in atop the seeds. Spring onions require good humus rich soil and full sun. “Rich in humus” means the material contains some organic matter, but maybe a lot of inert filler too.

Next up, radish, using our 2-by-1. Pressing down on the soft soil we trace a row parallel to the green onions, ensuring enough space between rows. At a depth of 2 inches, gently drop the seeds in the open row. Then gently collapse the soil back in atop the seeds. We did this for two rows. Remember, radish grows rapidly, there are many seeds, and this will need to be thinned out once the plants are at a good enough size. Radish requires good rich soil and full sun.

Next up, onion sets. For this one all you need do is press the onion firmly into the loose soil, leave a space of around 4 or 5 inches between plants as they do grow and spread their root base. We put in four rows of onions. Onions require good rich well-drained soil and full sun.

Next up, carrots, using the 2-by-1. Pressing down on the soft soil, we trace a row parallel to the onions, ensuring enough space between rows. This time the seeds came encased in bio-degradable paper strips. At a depth of 2 inches, lay the paper strips down inside the row, gently water the paper then collapse the soil over the paper. Once the carrot seeds have taken, the plants tend to grow rapidly. Carrots requires good rich soil and full sun.

Having planted two rows of carrots, the Vegepod is full. It may not have looked it at the time, but in four weeks I am convinced it will look very different. Having planted everything, we made up a mix of Sea Magic, a complete fertilizer, ensuring the plants have a good start in life. Ah, only to be eaten… Sorry.

Gord enjoyed the experience and left a little later. Now, time for another coffee.

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